The Dormant Environment

Death Valley Spring 2005 Bob Canfield

I was listening to a TED talk and the speaker threw out the word “Dormant”.  He used it to describe Death Valley which is named Death Valley because, well, nothing grows there.  No rain=No growth.  However, something happened in 2004….it rained (7 inches in fact) and in the Spring of 2005 Death Valley was having quite a hard time living up to the name.  The floor of Death Valley was covered in flowers.  Turns out Death Valley isn’t dead.  It’s dormant.  Underneath the barren landscape was loads of potential just waiting for an inviting environment.

I’m a little obsessive about environments – specifically environments for teams to be successful.  Today, more than ever, there are companies, consultants and coaches out there trying to crack the Agile nut in order to deliver value more frequently, efficiently and of higher quality.  It’s a HARD nut to crack.  The frameworks, Scrum, Kanban, XP and the consolidation of them in SAFe provide the manual and direction for companies to take.  Yet….they’re [still] not seeing the expected and much-desired results and I believe, with every nook and cranny of my heart, the reason lies in the environment.

DORMANCY:  The state of quiet (but possibly temporary) inaction. – Definition from http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu

Underneath the surface of the frameworks we’re using or, if you prefer, the foundation, are the Agile and lean values and principles.  But, I don’t believe the appropriate amount of time and attention is spent on teaching these.  Certainly not to the point where they’re understood well enough to be put into practice.  What’s more, I don’t believe most environments are suitable for the demonstrative manifestation of these values and principles.  So then what you end up seeing are the process side of frameworks in action – not people.  The frameworks are designed to bring the values and principles to life.  Frameworks need people to bring THE FRAMEWORK to life.  So, really, you need people to bring the values and principles to life and the environment, generally, just isn’t conducive.

Occasionally, there will be a micro-climate where, somehow, a team is flourishing.  I’ve heard these teams referred to as “magic teams”.  The magic of them is they created their own environment or micro-climate and bucked the odds – kind of like the Spring of 2005 in death valley.  Which, goes to show you, it’s not actually magic…it’s the environment.  Creating the environment is the key to unlocking the potential of people to bring the framework and the values and principles to life which will then bring the amazing results we’re all searching and striving for.  Oddly enough, those micro-climates are noticed by others as well.  The magic team is sought after and asked about their secret and the magic team will gladly, willingly give it away and, then, those seekers will tell you all the reasons why replicating it just aren’t possible elsewhere.

Maybe we just take for granted the environment will be there or it will evolve to meet the changes in process and approach.  Or, perhaps we don’t even want to think about the environment because changing or creating environments is difficult, hard work.  Also, there’s nothing telling you that a framework NEEDS any certain type of environment.  All of that said, I can’t think of a single organization who isn’t fully capable  and up to the challenge of creating an environment to enable success.  Especially if, at the end of all that work, the results would be nothing short of spectacular.  I would go so far to argue that the environment of every organization is dormant….quietly inactive.  I may even take it a step further and say the “environmentalists”, or those with the ability to be, are complacent.  Meanwhile, there’s all this potential just there, waiting for the right environment or a very persuasive environmental activist to get the ball rolling.

 

 

 

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It Is What It Is?

Admittedly, I have said this phrase far more than anyone ever should.  And, it’s not a positive phrase either.  It smacks of complacency and disengagement.  It means you KNOW something is wrong and feel powerless to change it or, really, even try.  On one team, I said this phrase so darn much I wrote it on the back of one of those Long John Silvers pirate hats and wore it so I wouldn’t have to say it.   When you hear this phrase, the response should be “Why?”.   When something wrong is so ingrained in the culture that “It is what it is” becomes an acceptable response, it’s time to find out why it is and make it isn’t.  I know that last sentence makes no sense but, I’m certain you get my meaning.  Listen for this phrase and hone in on it.  If nothing else it starts a dialogue about “It” and maybe gets others questioning, searching and, I dunno, solving IT?

An Open Mind is a Terrible Thing To Waste

I was given some really good advice tonight:  In every situation you find yourself in, no matter how many times you have seen it, you must treat it like it’s the first time.  You need to look at it with fresh eyes and try to remember what it was like, for you, the first time. I just loved how that was put.  Once you have gone through the “same” process enough times, it would be easy to become a little numb to all the dynamics in play.  It may also be easy to be a little insensitive to those who are experiencing something for the first time.  As a Scrum Master, having an open mind is critical.

I know, personally, I have been put with new teams – just coming together and finding myself less patient with them because I KNOW what’s coming.  But, really, I don’t.  I mean, it may be fair to say that I know where they will end up but that’s not the important part when a new team is coming together.  It’s HOW the team comes together that’s important and, if I’m less patient or dismissive, that can really impact the HOW and can also completely negate my “where they will end up” comfort.

There was a team I worked with a long time ago and the set up was somewhat screwy.  Despite having learned that I don’t know it all several times over, when this team started, I wasn’t in the right frame of mind.  There was a lot going on for me and I wasn’t invested in them.  I wasn’t really there to help them.  I dismissed their concerns and told them to “trust me”.  Rightfully so, they didn’t.  Why should they?  I was very clearly not engaged.  My mind wasn’t open to them and theirs sure wasn’t open to mine.  This team was completely new to Agile and I was doing them a disservice.  I didn’t want to go through their phases with them.  I wanted them to hurry up and get there.  You can imagine how well that worked out.  It didn’t.  Not at all.

I did recognize it and made moves to correct it quickly but, it didn’t matter much.  They had no reason to trust me, value my opinion or seek my advice.  What resulted was dysfunction at my hands.  It was a complete waste of an opportunity for them and for me.  A Scrum Master has a special relationship with a team because her focus is the team.  She can shape the safe environment teams need to learn and grow.  She can guide them through learning Scrum and help them chart their course to greatness IF two things are true:

1.  The Scrum Master has opted in and has an open mind to her new team.

2.  The Team has an open mind with regards to the Scrum Master and tackling Scrum.

I believe, if you begin with an open mind, there’s a bigger potential for greatness.  With an open mind you listen with the goal of understanding.  Being open automatically requires courage which is definitely needed when charting new territory.  Openness allows you to view your team positively.  Openness nurtures trust. When you’re listening, exploring, trying, brainstorming with the team, you’re building that trust and camaraderie.

As a Scrum Master, when you find yourself in a new environment or situation, don’t bring the events of the past with you.  Open your mind to what is possible.  Keep your eyes wide to observe and listen.  Remember that, though familiar, it’s only familiar to you.  Explore the solutions with your team with minds wide open and you’ll find the journey will be full of learning for everyone.  Even you, the Scrum Master who (thinks she) has seen it all.  Every team is different and so is their path.  Be open to their adventure.