Agile Adoption is Not an Easy Road – Make it easier

An Agile adoption has the potential to super-charge results.  The methodology is simple, rational and makes complete sense.  This  is probably the reason why so many companies give it a go.  Something that is often overlooked when considering Agile adoption is the fact that moving to Agile will, in addition to improving your ability to deliver value faster, expose the things in your organization that aren’t working.  And, it won’t be subtle.  As soon as you start moving, you will start hearing about the problems.

Organizations need to be prepared to hear these things.  They cannot be defensive or try to hide or ignore them.  They need to  fix them….FAST.  It’s a good idea for organizations to acknowledge they probably have opportunities and be open to hearing the reality from the team members who are feeling the pain.  If you’re not willing to listen and act what will happen is apathy, disengagement and Agile Adoption failure.  All the energy you had going into the adoption from the teams will fade.  Team members will likely go back to the old way of doing business and feel resentful about having to fake Agile.  They will stop telling you what is wrong because they know you either won’t act or they will actually get in trouble for raising the problem.

The organization may feel frustrated because they have all these Agile teams working on delivery.  They have spent gobs on training and coaches.  They have re-engineered their metrics.  But, they are not seeing massive improvement.  They will look at velocity.  They will assess the teams.  They will conduct focus groups.  They may hire outside help.  They will spend serious time and money to figure out what the heck the problems are and they will likely find the problems are the same as those they heard about in the first month of adoption.

There’s loads of information out there about the typical problems organizations face when moving to Agile.  It’s not a big secret but, an organization has to go looking for it.  There’s an opportunity to talk about this openly and candidly before pulling the trigger to set the expectations for leadership and define the behaviors leaders need to exhibit and demand from their management in order to create an environment for success.  Delivery teams will appreciate it as will leaders who truly want to improve and be successful.  It establishes openness from the very start as well as initiates the shift to servant leadership.  Finally, it gets people thinking in terms of trying, failing, learning and trying again.  Continuous improvement…

I hadn’t thought about it in this way before.  Honestly, I figured it might be best to just get an organization started.  Jump on in!  But, I believe it’s a disservice to the people in the delivery teams who will be trying their best to make this work.  Giving leaders visibility into the lessons learned by others and encouraging new behaviors and approaches is a good thing.  Imagine how cool it would be for team members to hear leaders from the very top all the way down saying “I want to know what’s wrong so I can fix it for you.  I don’t want you to have to focus on the problems or be held up by them.  I want to know so that it’s easier for you to be as awesome as you can be.”

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2 thoughts on “Agile Adoption is Not an Easy Road – Make it easier

  1. Amen! In just my area, we’ve been doing Agile for about a year, with about 3-4 months at Scale (with the whole area involved), and we’re constantly having to address pain points and fix problems. We have to balance our perspective by saying “Yes, we’re much better than we were a year ago” and “Yes, we still have a ton to work on” – celebrate our progress without becoming complacent and recognizing our issues without becoming despondent. This is why teaching Agile principles as the first step of your transformation is so important! If you don’t get everyone bought in to a Kaizen mindset then it’ll either fail altogether or you’ll only get superficial improvements. It’s not enough to know to “fail fast”, you have to expect to fail so that you’ll notice it when it happens and be able to do something about it quickly!

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